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Acupuncture and Herbal medicine for treatment of side effects during CHOP therapy

The University of Florida College of Veterinary Medicine is currently recruiting dogs recently diagnosed with multicentric lymphoma for a clinical research trial.  This trial is for the investigation of the addition of acupuncture and herbal medicines on the quality of life while undergoing CHOP therapy.

  • Inclusion Criteria: Any dog recently diagnosed with multicentric lymphoma and does not have other life threatening diseases.  The doctors will explain this to you.
  • Treatment: Participation involves multiple study visits. Owners will be asked to complete questionnaires evaluating their dog’s quality of life. This is a controlled study.  Your dog will receive active treatment (acupuncture and herbal medicine) or placebo treatment (sham acupuncture and matching capsule without active herbal ingredients).  CHOP therapy will be standard for all patients.
  • Cost: The study will pay for all costs associated with acupuncture and herbal medicine or placebo.  Owners are responsible for CHOP therapy and oncology examination visits.
  • Contact:  Contact the Oncology Staff at the Small Animal Hospital 1-866-247-7950 or 352-392-2235 or the Clinical Trials Coordinator at  mebohan@ufl.edu

Background:

Studies performed with human patients have shown that acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine have positive benefits for chemotherapy patients and/or those with geriatric health issues such as renal failure, heart failure, osteoarthritis or intervertebral disc disease. We seek to determine if dogs will experience similar benefits. Some clients of the UF Small Animal Hospital (SAH) have already elected to incorporate acupuncture and/or herbal medicine into the treatment plan for their animal receiving chemotherapy.

The purpose of this research is to determine if acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine used in addition to chemotherapy are safe and effective in preventing or lessening any of the possible side effects of chemotherapy, and whether these treatments improve remission and survival time or increase the quality of life of your dog. Possible complications of chemotherapy include bone marrow suppression and gastrointestinal toxicity which can lead to side effects like nausea, vomiting, lack of appetite, loose stools and/or depression. By participating in this controlled study, you and your dog will help us to determine if this is an area in which acupuncture and herbal medicine are beneficial.